Frequently Asked Questions

Some of the most Frequently Asked Questions about the Center for Tobacco Cessation are below. Please use this site to learn more about the CTC, how we can work together and about cessation in general. If you have any additional questions, please e-mail us at ctc@cancer.org.

Q: What is the Center for Tobacco Cessation?

A: The Center for Tobacco Cessation (CTC) is an organization focused solely on tobacco cessation issues. Jointly funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Cancer Society, the CTC serves as a source of the best available science on cessation and works with national partners to expand the use of effective tobacco dependence treatments and activities.

Q: What is the Center for Tobacco Cessation’s mission?

A: Our mission is to serve as the source of the best available science on cessation and to work with national partners to expand the use of effective tobacco dependence treatments and activities.

Q: How is the Center for Tobacco Cessation funded?

A: The CTC is jointly funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Cancer Society.

Q: Who works at the Center for Tobacco Cessation?

A: CTC has a small staff with varied expertise. Linda A. Bailey is the director of the Center for Tobacco Cessation. Meet the CTC staff in the “About Us” section.

Q: Where is the Center for Tobacco Cessation located?

A: The Center for Tobacco Cessation is located at 901 E St NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20004. Email us at ctc@cancer.org.

Q: What organizations does the CTC work with?

A: The Center for Tobacco Cessation works with partners who provide health care and public health services, pay for healthcare and public health care services, and make decisions about health care and health care services. In addition, we work with colleagues at leading voluntary, non-profit, and academic institutions with similar missions. If you are interested in finding out more about working with us, please email us at ctc@cancer.org or contact us (our address and phone number are below).

Q: Will the Center for Tobacco Cessation endorse my program or project?

A: The Center for Tobacco Cessation promotes effective cessation treatments and activities that are proven via rigorous scientific review. As a matter of policy, CTC does not endorse specific programs or projects.

Q: How do I get added or deleted from the CTC mail or email list?

A: To either be added or deleted from our lists, please send an e-mail to us at ctc@cancer.org. Be sure to include “add” or “remove” in the subject field, and enter the e-mail address you would like to be added or removed in the body of the message.

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Q: How can I obtain materials produced by the CTC?

A: Most documents produced by the Center for Tobacco Cessation are available electronically on this site at no cost. If you are interested in obtaining a single hard copy or desire multiple copies, please contact us via e-mail at ctc@cancer.org.

Q: How can I get involved with the CTC? Are there job opportunities with the CTC?

A: Occasionally, CTC has openings for interns or volunteers. If you would like to be considered for such a position, please contact us.

Q: Will a representative from the Center for Tobacco Cessation speak at my event?

A: Representatives are available to speak on tobacco cessation. For more information, please contact us and provide as much information as possible about the event.

Q: Does the Center for Tobacco Cessation provide grants?

A: The CTC does not award grants. We suggest that you consider applying for funding for tobacco prevention and control projects from philanthropic organizations, national voluntary organizations, or federal or state government agencies.

American Cancer Society
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
American Legacy Foundation
National Cancer Institute
State Health Departments

Q: What is tobacco cessation?

A: Tobacco cessation means stopping use of tobacco in any form (cigarettes, chewing, dip, etc.)

Q: What is the best way to quit using tobacco?

A: Most importantly, a tobacco user must consult their doctor before beginning any tobacco dependence treatment. Research shows that a tobacco user’s chances of quitting are greatly increased when they combine the use of certain pharmaceuticals (nicotine gum, patch, inhaler, nasal spray or the anti-depressant bupropion) with a form of counseling (calling a telephone quitline, meeting with support groups, etc).

Q: What resources are available to promote cessation?

A: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (http://www.ahrq.gov) makes many materials available for those wishing to quit tobacco use. They can also be reached at 800.358.9295. Information and resources are also available at the Surgeon General’s web site (http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/tobacco).

For Employers

Q: Should coverage include pharmacotherapy, behavioral interventions, or both and should coverage for one be dependent on use of the other?

A: Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: Clinical Practice Guideline (PHS 2000) recommends each alone as an effective intervention. Many smokers are unwilling to participate in behavioral interventions which means that tying pharmacotherapy and behavioral interventions together may decrease access to those smokers most highly committed to cessation.

Q: Should coverage include over-the-counter pharmacotherapy?

A: If employers want to maximize access to effective pharmacotherapy, the answer is “yes.” With rising pharmacy costs, health plans have a strong incentive to shift those costs, whenever possible, to the patients. This creates a barrier to patients receiving the most effective treatment possible.

Q: How many courses of pharmacotherapy should be covered?

A: There is little evidence of abuse of pharmacotherapy for tobacco dependence. Research shows that among smokers with cost-free access to four courses of pharmacotherapy in a 12-month period, 73% accessed the benefit only once, 20% twice, and only 3% and 5% accessed it three and four times, respectively.

Q: Should out-of-pocket costs be eliminated?

A: The Guide to Community Preventive Services: Tobacco Use Prevention and Control (CDC 2000) and Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: Clinical Practice Guideline (2000) recommend reduction or elimination of out-of-pocket costs to increase use of smoking cessation treatment. Even if nominal co-pays are maintained, insurance coverage of the bulk of smoking-cessation treatment costs is an important step.